Biosocial Risk Factors and Protective Factors

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Biosocial risk factors and protective factors are two terms with the opposite meaning. Risk factors refer to the circumstances of biosocial nature that imply a higher likelihood of danger (Lilly, Cullen, & Ball, 2018). In turn, protective factors can be defined as biosocial characteristics that lower the possibility of negative outcomes (Lilly et al., 2018). In this regard, protective factors reduce the impact of risk factors (Moore, Milam, Folk, & Tangney, 2018). This paper aims to determine the biosocial risk and protective factors associated with behavioral patterns development.

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It is crucial to identify risk factors and protective factors as they result from various environments. For example, three important biosocial risk factors include family conflicts, illicit substance usage, and trauma. The family environment is crucial for the formation of prosocial behaviors, and conflicts can cause antisocial behaviors. Drug usage can change a person’s perception of life, while trauma increases the risk of inadequacy in social interactions. On the other hand, three critical biosocial protective factors include quality education, positive relationships among families, and good health. In this regard, quality education increases a person’s chances of employment, while a positive family environment lowers the chances of antisocial behaviors. Good health provides a person with opportunities to succeed in life. Overall, risk factors and protective factors are an integral part of human life that define people’s attitudes.

To summarize, biosocial risk factors and protective factors are crucial to consider when trying to interpret an individual’s behavior. These two domains are interrelated and associated with the social environment and genetics. The lack of protective factors increases the possibility of adverse outcomes, while their presence can balance out risk factors. Strengthening protective factors in communities can be beneficial for every individual and society as a whole.

References

Lilly, J.R., Cullen, F.T., & Ball, R.A. (2018). Criminological theory: Context and consequences (7th ed.). Choosing crime in everyday life: Routine activity and rational choice theories (pp. 345–372). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.

Moore, K. E., Milam, K. C., Folk, J. B., & Tangney, J. P. (2018). Self-stigma among criminal offenders: Risk and protective factors. Stigma and health, 3(3), 241. Web.

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PsychologyWriting. (2022, January 29). Biosocial Risk Factors and Protective Factors. Retrieved from https://psychologywriting.com/biosocial-risk-factors-and-protective-factors/

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PsychologyWriting. (2022, January 29). Biosocial Risk Factors and Protective Factors. https://psychologywriting.com/biosocial-risk-factors-and-protective-factors/

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"Biosocial Risk Factors and Protective Factors." PsychologyWriting, 29 Jan. 2022, psychologywriting.com/biosocial-risk-factors-and-protective-factors/.

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PsychologyWriting. (2022) 'Biosocial Risk Factors and Protective Factors'. 29 January.

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PsychologyWriting. 2022. "Biosocial Risk Factors and Protective Factors." January 29, 2022. https://psychologywriting.com/biosocial-risk-factors-and-protective-factors/.

1. PsychologyWriting. "Biosocial Risk Factors and Protective Factors." January 29, 2022. https://psychologywriting.com/biosocial-risk-factors-and-protective-factors/.


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PsychologyWriting. "Biosocial Risk Factors and Protective Factors." January 29, 2022. https://psychologywriting.com/biosocial-risk-factors-and-protective-factors/.