Randomized Prevention Trial for Early Conduct Problems

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Controversies Regarding the Article

In the article “Randomized Prevention Trail for Early Conduct Problems: Effects on Proactive Parenting and Links to Toddler Disruptive Behaviour” by Frances Gardner, Daniel Shaw, Thomas Dishon, Jenifer Burton and Lauren Supplee, the authors showcases the development stages that children go through as they grow up. The authors clearly elaborate factors that encourage children to engage into activities that are not moral and discouraged by the society as a whole. The article further brings into details the role of the parents and advices for positive parenting strategies that facilitate prevention of early childhood problems during child development (Gardner, Shaw, Dishon, Burton & Supplee, 2007). Parents are encouraged to monitor the acts of their children closely as they grow up to adulthood.

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Advices for Positive Parenting

One of the theories the authors convey as an example is the introduction of a flowchart. The flowchart explains the demographic characteristics of male children between the age of seventeen to twenty-seven months old (Gardner, Shaw, Dishon, Burton & Supplee, 2007). Participants of the survey conducted were male children only. Out of the eligible mothers approached to participate in the study, less than half the mothers interviewed by word of mouth were eligible for participation. In addition, eligible single mothers constituted half the eligible participants.

Purpose of the Study

The authors clearly state that the purpose of the study focuses on change in child and parenting behaviour (Gardner, Shaw, Dishon, Burton & Supplee, 2007). The study majorly focuses on positive and negative parenting by group allocation. The authors indicate that the participants in the study were grouped according to their age and comparisons were made to highlight the different results realised (Gardner, Shaw, Dishon, Burton & Supplee, 2007). The authors display clearly reasons and factors influencing negative parenting.

Recruitment of Research Participants

Eligible participants of the research were women who had male children between the age of seventeen months to twenty-seven months old (Gardner, Shaw, Dishon, Burton & Supplee, 2007). The authors however clearly states that out of the qualified mothers, less than half the number turned up for the survey (Gardner, Shaw, Dishon, Burton & Supplee, 2007). The aim of the study was to determine the risk factors that children undergo during early child development. The study also targeted high-risk families. Mothers who had male children between the age of seventeen and twenty-seven months old were invited to participate in the study (Gardner, Shaw, Dishon, Burton & Supplee, 2007). Participants were also required to fill in a questioner before participating in the study. Homes of the participants were the site of the data collection for the study. The authors indicate that eligible participants participated in a video-recorded observation task that lasted for two and a half hours (Gardner, Shaw, Dishon, Burton & Supplee, 2007). Eligible mothers who participated in the study received compensation for participating and giving out information as required by the surveyors.

Setting Of Collection of Date

Participants gave written informed consent through video recording and further required to fill a questioner (Gardner, Shaw, Dishon, Burton & Supplee, 2007). Participants passed through an assessment on different tests. Participants went through a number of tests including demographics. Through this test, participating mothers were required to give out information such as their educational level, income status, family structure and sources of stressors within the family. Another source of test for the participants went through was parent-child interaction at home that included a video recording section (Gardner, Shaw, Dishon, Burton & Supplee, 2007). Positive and proactive parenting was also one of the tests the participants went through for the success of the survey. The authors argue that this test included suggestions of constructive activities that children went through at their early age (Gardner, Shaw, Dishon, Burton & Supplee, 2007). Among other things, mothers participating in the study were required to state playful strategies of their children.

Tests and Forms of Assessment

Another test participating mothers were required to go through was negative parenting (Gardner, Shaw, Dishon, Burton & Supplee, 2007). At this stage, participants gave out information that led to negative parenting, factors that result from positive parenting and how positive parenting affect young children. Eligible participants went through the required process of the study, and the researchers gave research findings based on information given by the participants. Eligible parents with young male children who participated were required to fill in questioner forms. In addition, participating mothers were also required to go through video recording as part of the survey.

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Results Obtained From the Research

Results obtained from the research advised a change in parenting and child behaviour. The results also obtained conjectures change in child behaviour where evident change in parenting is realized (Gardner, Shaw, Dishon, Burton & Supplee, 2007). The outcome of the research shows that positive parenting helps minors not to engage in activities considered immoral in the society. Following a family intervention by the researchers, findings of the research shows potential change in proactive and positive parenting skills from the parents (Gardner, Shaw, Dishon, Burton & Supplee, 2007). In addition, the research also demonstrates that positive parenting contributes much to the behaviour of the child (Gardner, Shaw, Dishon, Burton & Supplee, 2007). Negative parenting activities lead to destructive behaviour of the child during early development. Children in return engage in activities that are not of benefit.

Results Obtained From the Research

The authors further give example of destructive behaviour to include drug abuse, lack of skills to regulate emotions, unsafe behaviour, non-considerate of their safety and the safety of other children. Participating parents did not expect the finding of the research. Most participants embraced positive parenting (Gardner, Shaw, Dishon, Burton & Supplee, 2007). The authors argue this will enable the children to be morally upright and to have good behaviour during early development. The author also suggests this finding by the researchers. The research indicates positive implications. Parents are encouraged to take into account results from the findings to enable their children to have positive morals during their early development.

Conclusion

In conclusion, the research findings endorse use in public policy in numerous ways. The information of the study encourages dissemination to benefit other parents who did not participate in the study. The finding of the results will in return assist parents and help them bring up their children in a proper way. More mothers that are eligible should participate in the study. Increase in participating parties enables researchers to obtain more findings, which in return enable them to come up with findings that are more accurate.

Recommendation of upfront compensation of eligible participating parents necessitates consideration. Through upfront payment, participants consider the researchers more serious concerning the research. Decision to pay a fee upfront should only be upon agreement that those who receive the money will participate in the study. In addition, the research enables readers to understand more about positive parenting. The research also illustrates how parenting adds value during the early development of the child. Parents should be encouraged to attend classes concerning positive and negative parenting to enable them understand more on how they should bring up their children and how to treat them during their early development.

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References

Gardner, F., Shaw, D., Dishon, T., Burton, J. & Supplee, L. (2007). Randomized Prevention Trail for Early Conduct Problems: Effects on Proactive Parenting and Links to Toddler Disruptive Behaviour. American Psychological Association 21(3), 398-406.

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PsychologyWriting. (2022, January 15). Randomized Prevention Trial for Early Conduct Problems. Retrieved from https://psychologywriting.com/randomized-prevention-trial-for-early-conduct-problems/

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PsychologyWriting. (2022, January 15). Randomized Prevention Trial for Early Conduct Problems. https://psychologywriting.com/randomized-prevention-trial-for-early-conduct-problems/

Work Cited

"Randomized Prevention Trial for Early Conduct Problems." PsychologyWriting, 15 Jan. 2022, psychologywriting.com/randomized-prevention-trial-for-early-conduct-problems/.

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PsychologyWriting. (2022) 'Randomized Prevention Trial for Early Conduct Problems'. 15 January.

References

PsychologyWriting. 2022. "Randomized Prevention Trial for Early Conduct Problems." January 15, 2022. https://psychologywriting.com/randomized-prevention-trial-for-early-conduct-problems/.

1. PsychologyWriting. "Randomized Prevention Trial for Early Conduct Problems." January 15, 2022. https://psychologywriting.com/randomized-prevention-trial-for-early-conduct-problems/.


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PsychologyWriting. "Randomized Prevention Trial for Early Conduct Problems." January 15, 2022. https://psychologywriting.com/randomized-prevention-trial-for-early-conduct-problems/.