A Tier 3 Intervention Behaviour Model: What Works Clearinghouse

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Introduction

A tier 3 intervention is a model where customized activities are developed to resolve students’ challenges in their social, academic, or behavioral lives. It is different from Tier 1 and Tier 2 interventions since it is intensive and more individualized. It is more explicit and developed to facilitate the acquisition of necessary skills. It is very time-consuming to fully implement the intervention to a small group of children, mostly comprised of two participants. The comprehensive integrated three-tiered models of prevention have clear guidelines on the three levels. A focus on the tier 3 intervention will highlight the significant aspects surrounding behavior as the chosen academic content area from What Works Clearinghouse.

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Main body

Behavior is a major indicator of students’ awareness of their surroundings and their response to the activities or people around them. It is used to assess cognitive and social skills based on inter-personal interactions (Harrison et al., 2019). Therefore, it is an excellent evidence-based practice since one can evaluate the situation from the first-hand data they collect. Several studies in WWC highlight the role of behavioral change as an intervention. They include Caring School Community program, social skills training, positive action, too good for drugs and violence, early risers, character lessons, fast track in elementary school, and the incredible years. The interventions were implemented in different categories, where the assessment levels were pre-kindergarten, kindergarten, and up to grade 12. Some of the interventions were mainly developed for a specific group, such as building decision skills for grade 12 or fast-tracking for elementary school for kindergarten students. Other interventions span over various levels, such as being too good for drugs monitored in grade 3 to grade 6.

Available resources demonstrate supporting evidence for coping power among early risers for kindergarten. Coping power emphasizes the necessary social and emotional skills required to successfully transition to middle-skills (Muratori et al., 2019). Some of the aspects covered are problem-solving, peer relationships, and anger management. Children meet for 50 minutes for thirty-four group sessions spanning over one and a half years. The parents’ sessions are sixteen to facilitate the transition through child study skills and appropriate stress management.

The early risers’ intervention practice teaches children skills that improve their academic success, peer relationships, and behavior control. This practice is introduced to the children in their classrooms. During group sessions at night after home visits, their parents are taught to identify the prevailing gaps in maintaining a healthy lifestyle. The parents learn how to have positive relationships with their children and effective discipline methods.

Conclusion

The material from What Works Clearinghouse gave essential pointers on the development of the intervention grid. The strategy is a tier 3 support since it intends to address individual students’ facing behavioral challenges. The intervention will be provided at school by the teachers. It will last for two years to ensure that the students have mastered all the specific skills for application to real-world scenarios. The exit criteria are based on major outcomes, such as proper peer relations, being on time for their sessions, asking questions without fear, improved academic performance, and playing.

The students at risk for emotional and behavioral disorders, either due to an unfavorable home environment or illness, will require a gentle intervention model approach. Several strategies can be applied to meet their needs to improve their academic performance. One of the methods is using words of affirmation frequently (French, 2019). The teachers will have to tell the students that they look good and they are bright. If there is a need for correction, the teacher should do such actions politely without reprimanding or discouraging students.

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References

French, D. D. (2019). Essential components of school-based intervention for students with emotional and behavioral disorders: An integration of research and practice. Preventing School Failure: Alternative Education for Children and Youth, 63(4), 369-381. Web.

Harrison, J. R., Soares, D. A., & Joyce, J. (2019). Inclusion of students with emotional and behavioral disorders in general education settings: A scoping review of research in the US. International Journal of Inclusive Education, 23(12), 1209-1231. Web.

Muratori, P., Lochman, J. E., Bertacchi, I., Giuli, C., Guarguagli, E., Pisano, S., Gallani, A., & Mammarella, I. C. (2019). Universal coping power for pre-schoolers: Effects on children’s behavioral difficulties and pre-academic skills. School Psychology International, 40(2), 128-144. Web.

Appendix A

Intervention Entry criteria Progress monitoring Exit criteria
Reading skills Students who portray difficulties reading in terms of sound projection or inability to decipher simple words. Availing different reading materials, such as newspaper cutting, simple online articles, and children storybooks. Reading fluency and enthusiasm.
Addressing social withdrawal Students who are overtly shy, less confident, and inactive in class. Their participation in group discussions and role-plays. The ability to engage with their peers effectively and active class participation.
Tired students Sleeping frequently in class and exhibiting drowsiness during class sessions. Assessing their home environment, keeping the students active. Increased alertness in class.

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PsychologyWriting. (2022, February 2). A Tier 3 Intervention Behaviour Model: What Works Clearinghouse. Retrieved from https://psychologywriting.com/a-tier-3-intervention-behaviour-model-what-works-clearinghouse/

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PsychologyWriting. (2022, February 2). A Tier 3 Intervention Behaviour Model: What Works Clearinghouse. https://psychologywriting.com/a-tier-3-intervention-behaviour-model-what-works-clearinghouse/

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"A Tier 3 Intervention Behaviour Model: What Works Clearinghouse." PsychologyWriting, 2 Feb. 2022, psychologywriting.com/a-tier-3-intervention-behaviour-model-what-works-clearinghouse/.

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PsychologyWriting. (2022) 'A Tier 3 Intervention Behaviour Model: What Works Clearinghouse'. 2 February.

References

PsychologyWriting. 2022. "A Tier 3 Intervention Behaviour Model: What Works Clearinghouse." February 2, 2022. https://psychologywriting.com/a-tier-3-intervention-behaviour-model-what-works-clearinghouse/.

1. PsychologyWriting. "A Tier 3 Intervention Behaviour Model: What Works Clearinghouse." February 2, 2022. https://psychologywriting.com/a-tier-3-intervention-behaviour-model-what-works-clearinghouse/.


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PsychologyWriting. "A Tier 3 Intervention Behaviour Model: What Works Clearinghouse." February 2, 2022. https://psychologywriting.com/a-tier-3-intervention-behaviour-model-what-works-clearinghouse/.