Competitors Who Choose to Be Red Have Higher Testosterone

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The article seeks to affirm the inclination of individuals with high testosterone levels to the color red. Many researchers have tried to link the color red to elevated performance, and testosterone in individuals. In addition, it has been proved that individuals with high testosterone levels are likely to go for the color red in the event they are required to pick a color representation in a competitive occasion. However, the article further explains that the color red does not elevate testosterone as it is believed and that its dominance is only felt when the opponent sees or links it to the competitors. As opposed to the color blue, to which red was compared, individuals who chose the color red are associated are dominance, aggression, risk, and power. The article further notes that based on research, selecting the color red did not appear to influence individuals’ color outcome in competitive tasks. According to the article, researchers are yet to find a concrete reason to back why the color red is the preferred choice for individuals with high testosterone levels (Farrelly Daniel, Slater Rebecca, and Hannar 21).

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It is interesting to note that the dominance of the color red is likely to be felt when it is on or somewhat visible to the competitor, and not when merely chosen like on a board or something relative. It has never occurred to me that an opponent could be intimidated by evidence of the color red on the competitors. I was of the assumption that it was more of a preference in terms of what people liked than a means of commanding respect or evoking some fear in the competition.

The article gives some instances, in which the color red was an advantage to individuals it represented in fields such as soccer, online games, and other forms of sport. The article also attributes the choice of color red more often than not to individuals with high testosterone level signifying their competitive edge. The color red is usually associated with thrill, aggression, and power. Just as interpreted by individuals who chose to go for it in the research as presented in the article, the color red gives people an edge. It tends to display a level of supremacy and command respect from individuals. In a real-life situation, signs representing danger or extremes are usually in the color red, meaning it is a color that is likely to cause an alarm or caution in individuals before they embark on something. Similar to the opponent intimidation theory, one can assume that an opponent in red color provokes some element of caution in the other competitor; to a point where their level of confidence in challenging the person represented by red will be slightly reduced (Boyle, Chapman, Burnham, McIntyre, Lipson and Ellison 125).

According to this article, human behavior is relative based on different personalities and gender. Researchers can anchor their future research study on the findings deduced from this article about the high level of testosterone linked with the dominance of the color red.

Conclusion

The findings in the research portrayed in this paper have shown an undeniable link between individuals with high testosterone, and their preference for the color red in competitive situations. The paper shows that the color red is considered dominant in terms of risk, aggression, power. Its findings can thus be considered a basis to which an individual’s level of risk or extremes can be gauged. In a way, it can be a determinant as to which individuals are likely to be more aggressive in handling issues or tasks. The association between individuals with high testosterone, and their preference for the color red seems valid. Color red commands respect and portray supremacy, which has been enforced by individuals who tend to it. Their reason for choosing to be associated with the color red is still not clear; however, it has been proved that the color red has an air of superiority over others.

Works Cited

Boyle GP, Chapman JF, Burnham TC, McIntyre MH, Lipson SF, and, Ellison PT. “Human male pair bonding and testosterone.” Journal of Human Nature 15. 2, (2004): 119–131. Print.

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Farrelly Daniel, Slater Rebecca, and Hannar R.Elliot. “Competitors who choose to be Red have higher Testosterone.” Journal of Psychological Science. 2013: 12-23. Print.

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PsychologyWriting. (2022, January 26). Competitors Who Choose to Be Red Have Higher Testosterone. Retrieved from https://psychologywriting.com/competitors-who-choose-to-be-red-have-higher-testosterone/

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PsychologyWriting. (2022, January 26). Competitors Who Choose to Be Red Have Higher Testosterone. https://psychologywriting.com/competitors-who-choose-to-be-red-have-higher-testosterone/

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"Competitors Who Choose to Be Red Have Higher Testosterone." PsychologyWriting, 26 Jan. 2022, psychologywriting.com/competitors-who-choose-to-be-red-have-higher-testosterone/.

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PsychologyWriting. (2022) 'Competitors Who Choose to Be Red Have Higher Testosterone'. 26 January.

References

PsychologyWriting. 2022. "Competitors Who Choose to Be Red Have Higher Testosterone." January 26, 2022. https://psychologywriting.com/competitors-who-choose-to-be-red-have-higher-testosterone/.

1. PsychologyWriting. "Competitors Who Choose to Be Red Have Higher Testosterone." January 26, 2022. https://psychologywriting.com/competitors-who-choose-to-be-red-have-higher-testosterone/.


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PsychologyWriting. "Competitors Who Choose to Be Red Have Higher Testosterone." January 26, 2022. https://psychologywriting.com/competitors-who-choose-to-be-red-have-higher-testosterone/.