Screen-Based Media and Children’s Brain Formation

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Social media has become an integral aspect of modern lifestyle, which is why its impact on people and their health serves as an area of intense interest. Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center (2019) conducted a study examining the effect screen-based media has on pre-school children. According to the report, increased screen time entails negative consequences in terms of children’s brain structural integrity. It impaired their ability to process information and impeded the development of literary skills.

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Overall, the structural changes mainly concerned the brain’s white matter, which is responsible for language and related activities. The types of media in question comprised all screen-based devices, such as computers and portable gadgets. Accordingly, it was concluded that excessive use of such devices is likely to cause serious white matter changes, making it more difficult for children to develop proper communicative skills.

The discussed report has important implications in terms of scientifically proven media impact. Generally, many people have been opposing the increasing popularity of screen-based media, and the judgment was often based on health-related concerns. The findings presented by Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center (2019) provide important evidence in favor of this point, showing that the concerns have been at least partially justified.

Additionally, the report is likely to attract the attention of researchers, who will continue the examination on a more profound level. As far as future research is concerned, it will be necessary to determine the exact patterns of screen-based media’s influence on the white matter. If there is a certain correlation between screen time and the structural changes in one’s brain, it must be distinguished. Besides, future research will determine whether the structural changes are long-term or even permanent. This way, the issue of screen-based media impact on public health will receive a proper examination, making it easier to propose viable, accurate solutions.

Reference

Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center. (2019). Screen-based media associated with structural differences in brains of young children. ScienceDaily. Web.

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PsychologyWriting. (2022, May 26). Screen-Based Media and Children’s Brain Formation. Retrieved from https://psychologywriting.com/screen-based-media-and-childrens-brain-formation/

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PsychologyWriting. (2022, May 26). Screen-Based Media and Children’s Brain Formation. https://psychologywriting.com/screen-based-media-and-childrens-brain-formation/

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"Screen-Based Media and Children’s Brain Formation." PsychologyWriting, 26 May 2022, psychologywriting.com/screen-based-media-and-childrens-brain-formation/.

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PsychologyWriting. (2022) 'Screen-Based Media and Children’s Brain Formation'. 26 May.

References

PsychologyWriting. 2022. "Screen-Based Media and Children’s Brain Formation." May 26, 2022. https://psychologywriting.com/screen-based-media-and-childrens-brain-formation/.

1. PsychologyWriting. "Screen-Based Media and Children’s Brain Formation." May 26, 2022. https://psychologywriting.com/screen-based-media-and-childrens-brain-formation/.


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PsychologyWriting. "Screen-Based Media and Children’s Brain Formation." May 26, 2022. https://psychologywriting.com/screen-based-media-and-childrens-brain-formation/.