Cognitive and Physical Self-Confidence

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According to Shultz (2020), self-confidence can be measured by two main principles: cognitive and physical confidence. Cognitive self-confidence is the measurement which determines how comfortable the person is with their abilities to think, express their thoughts and feelings, and stand out (Shultz et al., 2020). For example, in social gathering, this measurement would help to determine how much the person can share with the group of strangers when it comes to their opinions. Furthermore, it aids the person to express oneself physically as well, since it determines how comfortable a person would be with the change of their style.

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Moreover, the second principle is physical confidence, which determines how the person presents oneself, that is whether the person would be physically comfortable in the unfamiliar setting, or one would showcase signs of anxiety. Physical confidence stems from the cognitive one, however, the two measurements differ according to the research. As stated by McGrane et al. (2016), physical confidence depends on the person’s upbringing and can be measured through the validation of others. The more a person is validated in the eyes of others and themselves, the more confident they would appear.

If I were to conduct the research, I would try to follow the guidance of the two researchers, since I am curious to see the theory in work and measure self-confidence of people I know. Cognitive self-confidence can be measured by the amount of confidence the person expresses in tests or when uncovering their opinion publically. However, physical confidence can be measured by the calmness of the person in public, especially in the unknown setting. If the person receives positive validation, especially from their loved ones and friends, they are most likely to appear confident.

Reference

McGrane, B., Belton, S., Powell, D., Woods, C. & Issartel, J. (2016). Physical self-confidence levels of adolescents: Scale reliability and validity. Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, 19(7), 563-567. Web.

Shultz, K. S., Whitney, D. J., & Zickar, M. J. (2020). Measurement theory in action: Case studies and exercises. Routledge.

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PsychologyWriting. (2022, June 26). Cognitive and Physical Self-Confidence. Retrieved from https://psychologywriting.com/cognitive-and-physical-self-confidence/

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PsychologyWriting. (2022, June 26). Cognitive and Physical Self-Confidence. https://psychologywriting.com/cognitive-and-physical-self-confidence/

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"Cognitive and Physical Self-Confidence." PsychologyWriting, 26 June 2022, psychologywriting.com/cognitive-and-physical-self-confidence/.

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PsychologyWriting. (2022) 'Cognitive and Physical Self-Confidence'. 26 June.

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PsychologyWriting. 2022. "Cognitive and Physical Self-Confidence." June 26, 2022. https://psychologywriting.com/cognitive-and-physical-self-confidence/.

1. PsychologyWriting. "Cognitive and Physical Self-Confidence." June 26, 2022. https://psychologywriting.com/cognitive-and-physical-self-confidence/.


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PsychologyWriting. "Cognitive and Physical Self-Confidence." June 26, 2022. https://psychologywriting.com/cognitive-and-physical-self-confidence/.