The Behavioral, Humanistic, and Cognitive Approaches to Anxiety

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According to a psychologist who focuses on developmental psychology, Jake may have had accumulated anxiety from past encounters with challenging courses. He is linked to excessive burden to things like studying late at night, getting behind in class, and so on. Jake’s anxiety disorder may be viewed from three different psychological perspectives including behavioral, emotional, and humanistic. Each viewpoint differs from the others, but they all share certain commonalities. Behavioral perspective focuses on behavior improvement as a result of a stimulus and reaction. The term “cognitive” refers to a person’s thought process, way of thinking, and humanism stresses a person’s free will.

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The behavioral approach is stuck in the idea that the neighboring situation affects the victim, which can aid in knowing their decision. Behavioral therapists in Jake’s position would look at his adjacent environment and determine whether there is a need for any modification. He has to be trained to read, research, and evaluate in a way that causes him the least amount of discomfort. This method could suggest forming study groups or tutors to make Jake understand the information taught in the more complex classes, hence lessening the aggregate pressure he has about the course.

A good psychologist believes in the humanistic methodology, which argues that people continually aspire to better themselves despite them being good. This approach would look at Jake’s condition and comprehend why he has such emotion about the course weight. It will then argue that while Jake’s critical and fundamental needs have been met, he now aims for the highest degree of accomplishment, self-actualization after his basic needs have been fulfilled. His anxiety stems from the possibility of failing to achieve his objectives. A humanistic psychologist will anticipate that by sharing his state of mind and realizing that someone sympathizes with him, he can now recognize that he has what it takes to grab his demanding class program.

From a cognitive viewpoint, the psychologist would look at what is happening in Jake’s mind. One might argue that Jake’s anxiety is hereditary and that he has always been anxious. Jake cannot control the neurons in his brain, and they fire in a way that causes him to overthink and worry. With Jake’s nervousness, the approach would consider what Jake expects from himself and whether he can achieve the prospects or not. If Jake gives negative self-talk, the therapist will try to change the emotional dialogue to a more optimistic turn. By applying this, Jake will feel less anxious, thus making him more confident in his studies. If anxiety is, in reality, a mental illness, Jake may be given anti-anxiety medication to help him cope with his apprehension.

Even though the three approaches acknowledge that Jake’s anxiety is a real issue and needs help to make a concerted effort to keep things under management, they have different ways of handling the subject. Humanistic psychologists use empathy by looking at Jake’s thoughts and feelings to encourage him to manage and assess stress. On the other hand, behaviorists would enable him to look for help for his difficult classes from study groups and tutors through examining his environment (Yusa 232). Finally, his mental talk will be determined by the cognitive approach, which would look at how his mental speech affects his emotions and thus positively tone him, hence increasing his self-confidence. In this way, the three approaches are practical, and they all find a way to assist Jake’s anxiety.

Work Cited

Yusa, Michiko. “Dōgen And The Feminine Presence: Taking A Fresh Look Into His Sermons And Other Writings”. Religions, vol 9, no. 8, 2018, p. 232. MDPI AG.

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PsychologyWriting. (2022, June 15). The Behavioral, Humanistic, and Cognitive Approaches to Anxiety. Retrieved from https://psychologywriting.com/the-behavioral-humanistic-and-cognitive-approaches-to-anxiety/

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PsychologyWriting. (2022, June 15). The Behavioral, Humanistic, and Cognitive Approaches to Anxiety. https://psychologywriting.com/the-behavioral-humanistic-and-cognitive-approaches-to-anxiety/

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"The Behavioral, Humanistic, and Cognitive Approaches to Anxiety." PsychologyWriting, 15 June 2022, psychologywriting.com/the-behavioral-humanistic-and-cognitive-approaches-to-anxiety/.

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PsychologyWriting. (2022) 'The Behavioral, Humanistic, and Cognitive Approaches to Anxiety'. 15 June.

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PsychologyWriting. 2022. "The Behavioral, Humanistic, and Cognitive Approaches to Anxiety." June 15, 2022. https://psychologywriting.com/the-behavioral-humanistic-and-cognitive-approaches-to-anxiety/.

1. PsychologyWriting. "The Behavioral, Humanistic, and Cognitive Approaches to Anxiety." June 15, 2022. https://psychologywriting.com/the-behavioral-humanistic-and-cognitive-approaches-to-anxiety/.


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PsychologyWriting. "The Behavioral, Humanistic, and Cognitive Approaches to Anxiety." June 15, 2022. https://psychologywriting.com/the-behavioral-humanistic-and-cognitive-approaches-to-anxiety/.