Video Gaming and Children’s Psychosocial Well-Being

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The article of interest is “Video Gaming and Children’s Psychosocial Well-being: A Longitudinal Study” by Lobel, Adam, et al. With over 2 billion players globally, video games are tremendously popular leisure. Nonetheless, both the media and experts are worried about the results of extreme video gaming. In this article, the effect of computer games on kids’ mental improvement is, as yet, a hot subject. During one year, 194 children participated in cooperative and competitive video games with a high frequency of playing (Lobel, Et al., pg.889). Parents were also asked about their children’s psychological well-being. At the time, games were linked to an increase in emotional disorders. Throughout this article, psychosocial changes were not linked to violent gambling. Collaborative games had little effect on changes in prosocial behavior. Finally, competitive video games were linked to decreased prosocial conduct in youngsters who played them regularly. As a result, the game’s frequency was linked to greater internalization but not externalization, attention, or peer difficulties. There was no link between violent gambling and an increase in externalization difficulties.

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Duplication, they conclude, is required to create more nuanced and generalizable conclusions, and future research must better discriminate between different game forms. Most aspects of a child’s psychological development did not appear to be harmed by video games (Lobel, Et al., pg. 889). Parents should pay special attention to video games might exacerbate a child’s internalization problem. The negative effects of playing violent video games are still a hot topic, and this study showed no indication that they have any impact on problem externalization or prosocial behavior. As a result of their cooperative game, competitive gamers may be at risk of becoming less prosocial. This article also evaluates and categorizes the different social and emotional processes elicited by various games and game genres, as well as tried and true methodologies for analyzing the social environment of video gaming sessions. This article neglects to research the connection between dangerous computer game utilization and its mental reason, just as why individuals play computer games in any case. Gamers’ motives for playing and favorite game genres are connected to psychological function in various ways, with distraction-motivated gamers and action game players showing the most substantial impacts.

The article failed to determine if video games cause these mental health risks in addition to examining the relationship between potentially problematic video game use and psychological function and the relationship between why individuals play video games and psychological function, it is also vital to determine which game type people like. In order to make it better research, the authors should have focused on how gender, age, game purpose, and game preference genre may play a part in the link between video games and psychological function. It is also worth emphasizing that the current research is only based on a self-selected group of potentially harmful video gamers.

The study fails to focus on player behavior in-game and assess various usage patterns in a more objective and targeted manner. It also fails to focus on player behavior in-game to analyze various use patterns in a more objective and targeted manner (Lobel et al., pg. 889). There is a risk that more information will come to light. The current study adds to our understanding of video games by uncovering particular correlations and distinct psychological functions. Potentially harmful video games are linked to good effects and social interactions while playing, psychological symptoms, maladaptive coping methods, unpleasant emotions, low self-esteem, loneliness preferences, and non-compliance.

Works Cited

Lobel, Adam, et al. “Video Gaming and Children’s Psychosocial Well-being: A Longitudinal Study.” Journal of Youth and Adolescence, vol. 46, no. 4, 2017, pp. 884-897. Web.

Paturel, Amy. “Game Theory: The Effects of Video Games on the Brain.” Brain & Life, 2014, Web.

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PsychologyWriting. (2022, October 30). Video Gaming and Children's Psychosocial Well-Being. Retrieved from https://psychologywriting.com/video-gaming-and-childrens-psychosocial-well-being/

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PsychologyWriting. (2022, October 30). Video Gaming and Children's Psychosocial Well-Being. https://psychologywriting.com/video-gaming-and-childrens-psychosocial-well-being/

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"Video Gaming and Children's Psychosocial Well-Being." PsychologyWriting, 30 Oct. 2022, psychologywriting.com/video-gaming-and-childrens-psychosocial-well-being/.

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PsychologyWriting. (2022) 'Video Gaming and Children's Psychosocial Well-Being'. 30 October.

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PsychologyWriting. 2022. "Video Gaming and Children's Psychosocial Well-Being." October 30, 2022. https://psychologywriting.com/video-gaming-and-childrens-psychosocial-well-being/.

1. PsychologyWriting. "Video Gaming and Children's Psychosocial Well-Being." October 30, 2022. https://psychologywriting.com/video-gaming-and-childrens-psychosocial-well-being/.


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PsychologyWriting. "Video Gaming and Children's Psychosocial Well-Being." October 30, 2022. https://psychologywriting.com/video-gaming-and-childrens-psychosocial-well-being/.