Emotion Regulation Therapy for Generalized Anxiety Disorder

Cite this

Notes

Every psychologist would like to find out the best method of treating stress and depression. The article presents research on the best way to tend to such medical issues. The ERT, or the Emotional Regulation Therapy, demonstrates significant improvement in treating anxiety, depression, life satisfaction, ruminating, worrying, and being unable to manage feelings (Mennin et al., 2018). Furthermore, the treatment ensures that there is no delayed treatment, and the patient gets a full recovery. Emotional Regulation Therapy is based on an impressive framework that affects even the sciences.

Cut 15% OFF your first order
We’ll deliver a custom Psychological Disorders paper tailored to your requirements with a good discount
Use discount
322 specialists online

Description

During my study on the effective methods of treating depression, anxiety, and other emotional disorders, I came across an article entitled “A randomized controlled trial of emotional therapy for generalized anxiety disorder with or without co-occurring disorder” (Mennin et al. 2018). The article provided robust evidence on the emotional disorders, control, and how anxiety can be managed when there is a co-occurring disorder.

Analysis

Fifty-three diagnosed with 43% GAD with comorbid MDD were taken to through the treatment process with a (MAC, n =25) and ERT (n=28) attention control condition modified on an open trial. The treatment process took precisely nine months before any analysis of the results was done. The main goal of the treatment section was to determine the best method of stress and depression treatment.

Reflection

Unlike MAC patients, ERT patients experienced a clinical and statistically significant improvement in clinical indicators of MDD and GAD, rumination, quality of life, comorbid disorder, functional impairment, metacognitive, emotional regulation, and the hypothesized mindful attentions. Moreover, these improvements showed primary outcomes where the patients subjected to ERT treatment made a full recovery. This means that ERT is a suitable treatment mechanism and points towards a productive ending for improving and treating many clinical conditions that are very complex, for example, GAD, which has a co-occurring MMD.

Reference

Mennin, D. S., Fresco, D. M., O’Toole, M. S., & Heimberg, R. G. (2018). A randomized controlled trial of emotion regulation therapy for generalized anxiety disorder with and without co-occurring depression. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 86(3), 268–281. Web.

Cite this paper

Select style

Reference

PsychologyWriting. (2022, July 25). Emotion Regulation Therapy for Generalized Anxiety Disorder. Retrieved from https://psychologywriting.com/emotion-regulation-therapy-for-generalized-anxiety-disorder/

Reference

PsychologyWriting. (2022, July 25). Emotion Regulation Therapy for Generalized Anxiety Disorder. https://psychologywriting.com/emotion-regulation-therapy-for-generalized-anxiety-disorder/

Work Cited

"Emotion Regulation Therapy for Generalized Anxiety Disorder." PsychologyWriting, 25 July 2022, psychologywriting.com/emotion-regulation-therapy-for-generalized-anxiety-disorder/.

References

PsychologyWriting. (2022) 'Emotion Regulation Therapy for Generalized Anxiety Disorder'. 25 July.

References

PsychologyWriting. 2022. "Emotion Regulation Therapy for Generalized Anxiety Disorder." July 25, 2022. https://psychologywriting.com/emotion-regulation-therapy-for-generalized-anxiety-disorder/.

1. PsychologyWriting. "Emotion Regulation Therapy for Generalized Anxiety Disorder." July 25, 2022. https://psychologywriting.com/emotion-regulation-therapy-for-generalized-anxiety-disorder/.


Bibliography


PsychologyWriting. "Emotion Regulation Therapy for Generalized Anxiety Disorder." July 25, 2022. https://psychologywriting.com/emotion-regulation-therapy-for-generalized-anxiety-disorder/.